Q&A: ZOE FOSTER BLAKE – Author, Columnist, Beauty Editor, Founder of Go-To Skin Care

1277594_10151967999401065_6177361903731922192_o

TBS Contributor Rosie Panetta speaks to the fabulous Zoe Foster Blake about fitting it ‘all in,’ being online all the time and what it’s really like to be married to Hamish Blake. 

FITTING IT ALL IN

Author, blogger, fashionista, new skin-care line called Go-To, Mum, all-round awesome chick! Seriously, you have your fingers in a lot of pies. How the hell do you fit it all in? Especially when it comes to finding the time and inspiration to write amazing little gems, like your latest book ‘The Wrong Girl.’ Can you run us through an average Zoe day?

I get up when my baby boy Sonny does,usually around 6:30, and try to smash out some writing after a strong coffee/while he takes a 40-minute nap. (Always 40. Never a second more.) The rest of the day is a balance (a woozy, faltering one) of being with Sonny, working on my columns or Go-To, doing house stuff and running Just your classic work-from-home mum, really. But with more coffee.

BEING ONLINE ALL THE TIME

We’re in roles where we’re encouraged (somewhat obliged) to be present online, like all the time. Be it Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, a blog, whatever. You’re all over it, but do you ever find it a chore? Or are you actually really passionate about sharing good looking food?

I’d rather moose down my gelato than take 18 photos of it, but for the most part, yes I’m quite the social media pig. It’s fun, and it’s pervy and even inspiring (I follow some very funny people on Tumblr and Twitter who make me laugh a LOT) and it can be a wonderfully powerful tool if used right. For me as a writer, for example, if I tweet and Instagram in a way that people enjoy, perhaps they’ll be more likely to seek out my books or attend events I’m hosting or whatever. I also think it helps me stay connected – writing from home all day can be a bit isolating, and tooling around on social media makes me feel a bit more involved and, uh, social, as it were.

WHERE’S THE LINE

Obviously sharing our life experiences is fundamental, but it’s important to draw the line between what’s private and what’s worth sharing with the public. How/where do you draw that line?

On one hand, I think social media grants you more control over what the public see and perceive of you (releasing any ‘big news’ on there before traditional media gets to break it, for example). But you have to be mindful of the boundaries, because there is humanizing yourself (make up free selfies) and there is completely removing any mystery at all (posting sexy bedtime eyes photos that would have previously only been sent to your lover). It’s a bit gross and clinical, but you gotta remember that whatever you post online is irreversible and completely public. You lose all ownership over it once you press share. So make sure you really want it out there. Forever. Also, (and this is even more gross) I’m always mindful of my “brand” on social media. People don’t follow for me for my outspoken political opinion; they want something light and frothy. So sure, I have shit days, and I get upset about world events, but I don’t believe, for me at least, that twitter is the appropriate outlet for that. It’s for play and interactivity and engaging with fun people.

BEING THE PARTNER TO ALL THE CHARADES

I will be the first to openly admit radio hosts make horrible partners. I have no doubt my poor boyfriend has developed a deep distrust of private numbers and early morning phone calls thanks to my job. No doubt Hamish has pulled you in for the ride over the years as well – but how do you feel about getting involved on-air? Or potentially having every embarrassing moment you’ve ever experienced shared with Australia?

Happily, it’s not an issue. Hame is tremendously respectful, and I understand the enormous demand for content and the power of a good anecdote when you’re on air every day. (Especially since I have a weekly column and am constantly sniffing ‘round for my own content.) Plus, Hame and Andy are such gentle, friendly boys – I don’t live in fear of being pranked or made to look stupid. (Perfectly capable of that myself.)

 

About Author

Rosie Panetta
Rosie Panetta

HOT FM WA Breakfast Announcer